Showing posts with label lactobacillus. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lactobacillus. Show all posts

Saturday, October 17, 2015

JFARM Lactobacillus Probiotic and Organic Fertilizer

Proven effective in restoring the soil fertility and productivity by putting more earthworms and micro-organisms in the soil, beneficial for growing and fruit producing crops.
Faster decomposition of dry leaves, weeds, and branches. Essential element in organic farming,  reducing and eliminating the number of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO).


Gumagastos ba kayo para patayin ang fungi at mapanirang bacteria?
Mabagal ba lumaki at hindi maganda ang inyong mga halaman?
Mabaho ba sa inyong paligid?
Lagi ba kayong gumagastos sa deodorizer?

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Probiotics Lactobacillus Preparation

This is the workhorse of the beneficial bacteria we’ll be discussing here. We use it for everything! Foul odors, clogged drains, cheaper pig/chicken/etc farming, aquaculture, the applications are amazingly diverse. Learn how to make and use this and you will have a powerful tool in your farming arsenal.

How to Make:

  1. Get container, fill halfway with rice-wash. Rice wash is the water leftover when you rinse fresh rice. For example, go buy rice, whatever kind, bring it home, put it in a pot with warm water, swirl it a bit and then drain the [now milky colored] water. The water is now a rich source of carbohydrates. In this step, you can substitute rice with another carbohydrate source if you don’t have rice, as long as it is complex (don’t use simple carbohydrates like sugar, honey, syrup, molasses, etc). You can use wheat, barley, kinoa, other carbohydrates as the base to make your carbohydrate wash. This wash will attract microbes from the air, among them lacto bacilli.
  2. Cover loosely and let stand for a couple days to a week When is it done? When you see a light film on top (molds) and it smells a little sour and forms 3 layers. This is indicating the rice wash is infected with various microbes. This happens more quickly in warm temperatures because microbes are more active. Thus it is all relative since we don’t do this in controlled laboratory conditions.