Tuesday, September 25, 2012

SARS-like mystery illness emerges in Middle East

The World Health Organization in London had issued a global alert on Monday for a new SARS-like respiratory virus which left a man from Qatar critically ill in a London hospital and killed at least one more in Saudi Arabia.

The 49-year-old Qatari was admitted to an intensive care unit in Doha on September 7 suffering from acute respiratory infection and kidney failure before being transferred to Britain by air ambulance on September 11, the WHO said.

A Saudi Arabian national died earlier this year from a virtually identical virus, the WHO said, while Saudi medical authorities said they were investigating other possible cases of the disease.



The WHO confirmed the illness was in the coronavirus family but was not SARS, or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, which swept out of China in 2003, killing more than 800 people worldwide.

“This is a new virus,” WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl told AFP.

“We haven’t heard of any more new cases. We don’t have an appreciation of how widespread the virus is,” Hartl said. “This is one reason why we’re trying to get more information. We don’t know how it’s transmitted.”

The WHO said the Qatari first fell ill on September 3 after visiting Saudi Arabia.

Britain’s Health Protection Agency confirmed the presence of the new coronavirus and then found that it was a 99.5 percent match with a virus obtained from the lung tissue of a 60-year-old Saudi man who died earlier this year.

Coronaviruses are causes of the common cold but can also include more severe illnesses including SARS.

“Based on what we know about other coronaviruses, many of these contacts will already have passed the period when they could have caught the virus from the infected person,” it said.

John Watson, head of the respiratory diseases at the HPA, said: “Immediate steps have been taken to ensure that people who have been in contact with the UK case have not been infected, and there is no evidence to suggest they have.”

John Watson, head of the respiratory diseases at the HPA, said: “Immediate steps have been taken to ensure that people who have been in contact with the UK case have not been infected, and there is no evidence to suggest they have.”

Peter Openshaw, director of the Center for Respiratory Infection at Imperial College London, urged caution, saying any evidence of human-to-human transmission causing severe disease “would be very worrying”.

But fellow expert John Oxford, professor at the University of London, said he was “somewhat relaxed” because he believed the illness was more likely to behave “like a nasty infection rather than join the ‘exception’ group like SARS.”

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Ways to Minimize Exposure to Sun Radiation

There are different ways to escape the ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Here are some; 

  1. Avoid sun exposure. the sun's rays are strongest between 10 am to 2 pm.
  2. Avoid reflected sunlight from sand, pavements, or snow.
  3. Apply sunscreen with sun protection of at least SPF 15 (Sun Protection Factor). This should be repeated throughout the day if exposure is continuous. 
  4. Use sunscreens with prolonged exposure to artificial light source such as fluorescent lamps, welding arcs, cold quartz or bactericidal lamps.
  5. Wear protective clothing to reduce skin absorption of the radiation. smoke and smog in large cities only partially screens UVB rays so you have to be protected.

Monday, September 3, 2012

Care for the Atopic skin

The following are some of the procedures on how to care for atopic skin;

  1. Keep environment temperature constant
  2. Wear absorbent and non-irritating clothing (cotton)
  3. Use bland soap for laundry and rinse well
  4. Keep skin moist and supple
  5. Apply emollients or medicated creams immediately after bathing
  6. Frequent application of creams to soothe and protect the skin
  7. Adequate rest and relaxation are important
  8. positive outlook and emotional stability are essential

Saturday, September 1, 2012

Causes of Allergy

Here are the different causes of allergies.

Allergens that you Inhale

  1. House dust mites
  2. Cockroaches
  3. Pets
  4. Pollens from trees, grasses, and weeds
  5. Mold spores
  6. Dusts and fumes at work
Allergens that you Swallow or Eat